Smarter Travel LIVE! 2017

MKArena, Milton Keynes, 19-20 Oct

Practical Applications of Intelligent Mobility for Sustainable Towns and Cities

Smarter Travel Live! is one of the highlights of the packed 2017 innovative mobility calendar. TravelSpirit is very much on the agenda. Dr Maria Kamargianni, UCL MaaSLab, will be chairing the session on MaaS in practice, with Chris Lane from TfWM speaking about the development of Whim in the West Midlands.

Book now!

#smartertravellive

Sponsored by: ATKINS | Innovate UK | SYSTRA | TS Catapult

What’s on:

  • Street of the Future Exhibition – a live indoor demo of the latest products that will showcase the future of intelligent transport and street design. See more here.
  • Project Showcase – discover the Smart Mobility projects that are driving progress across the UK and Europe through 80 ‘bar table’ presentations. See more here.
  • Speakers – Over one hundred expert speakers to be announced over the coming weeks (see programme). Keynotes include:
  • David Bragden, Chief Executive, NYC Transit Center
  • Ian Meikle, Director of Infrastructure, Innovate UK
  • Jesse Norman MP, Parliamentary under Secretary of State for Transport, DfT
  • Paul Campion, CEO, Transport Systems Catapult
  • Geoff Snelson, Strategy Director, Milton Keynes Council
  • Stan Boland, CEO, FiveAI
  • Karine Dognin-Sauze, Vice President, Lyon Metropolis
  • Iain Forbes, Head, Centre for Connected & Autonomous Vehicles
  • Philippe Crist, Project Manager, International Transport Forum at OECD

Agenda:

  • Mobility as a Service
  • Intelligent Mobility
  • Accessibility & Integration
  • Customer Experience
  • Data and Applications
  • Smart Ticketing
  • Walking & Cycling
  • Cyber Security
  • EVs and EV Infrastructure
  • Air Quality, Safety and Healthy Streets

PROGRAMME | SPEAKERS | EXHIBITION | TICKETS

 

Conference Latest: TravelSpirit 2nd Annual Conference: Date and Venue Announced

TravelSpirit has opened bookings for its next conference:

Practical approaches to embedding Mobility as a Service in the UK

26 September 2017 | The Atrium, London NW1

Interested in Mobility as a Service (MaaS) and want to know more about issues around ‘Open’ and ‘Closed’, that will impact the spread of MaaS?

This conference showcases practical approaches to embedding Mobility as a Service in cities, towns and rural areas.

If you would like to explore issues around Mobility as a Service provision, and understand how to evaluate potential MaaS services, book now!

Speakers include: Jeni Tennison, OBE, Open Data Institute, Maria Kamargianni, UCL Energy Institute, Chris Lane, Transport for West Midlands, Chris Perry, MaaS Global, Gary Stewart, WayraUK and Si Ho, TravelSpirit Foundation.

Find out more

 

Whitepaper 3: Autonomy: The role of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence in Public Transportation and Urban Mobility for Cities

A range of autonomous vehicles (AVs), enabled by Robotics and Artificial Intelligence (RAI), are necessary for the evolution of Mobility as a Service (MaaS) as a global resource.

This white paper sets out our initial position and frames the debate around developments in autonomous mobility and how it can shape the new mobility frontier. It identifies concerns about autonomous transport solutions being developed by technologists, without a broader public policy framework. We highlight the risks that this direction of business development poses and how technology-driven innovation may present a serious threat to the vitality of our society.

Whitepaper 3: Autonomy: The role of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence in Public Transportation and Urban Mobility for Cities

Authors: Giles Bailey, Si Ho, Beate Kubitz, Sophie Peachey

TravelSpirit launches a new tool to measure the openness of a city’s transport system.

TravelSpirit continues its work on openness in Mobility as a Service by publishing a tool to assess how open new MaaS projects are.

The TravelSpirit Openness Index for Mobility as a Service is a practical tool to help create openness in practice. Created by the TravelSpirit UK Project Board, the tool consists of a methodology for assessing how open a Mobility as a Service offer is. It is an important addition to the growing library of TravelSpirit resources.

TravelSpirit is calling on UK transport practitioners to apply the tool on cities and transport operators. By ‘open-sourcing’ the methodology and working collaboratively the group is working to grow the UK Market for Mobility as a Service.

Chair of the TravelSpirit Foundation, Si Ho said:

“Openness is key to developing scalable, sustainable Mobility as a Service models for the public good. Our new tool enables closed and open elements to be identified – and the steps towards more openness to be quantified for the first time.”

The TravelSpirit Index of Openness for MaaS is a simple and practical tool to help those developing MaaS systems understand their current position and their potential for developing an open MaaS model.

The current version of the tool was peer reviewed and applied to the Transport for West Midlands MaaS project as a demonstrative case-study. The plan is to develop the tool further, with feedback from the UK transport community and support from University College London, who are planning to improve it over the summer, through a Masters dissertation project.

TravelSpirit is calling on the transport community to trial the Index and submit case studies to share understanding of openness in MaaS.  It is inviting contributions to validate and update the initial model and identify gaps, with a view to updating the tool in September 2017 – disseminating the findings at an event planned for the Autumn.

TravelSpirit Index of Openness for Mobility as a Service

TravelSpirit Index of Openness West Midlands Case Study

For further advice and guidance on its use or to submit case studies: info@travelspirit.io

Notes:

For further information please contact Beate Kubitz

Beate.Kubitz@travelspirit.io | +44 (0) 7974 369240

Key resources:

Whitepaper 1: Open or Closed? The Case for openness in Mobility as a Service

The updated TravelSpirit Index of Openness for Mobility as a Service will be published in late 2017.

Whitepaper 2: TravelSpirit Index of Openness in Mobility as a Service

The TravelSpirit Openness Index for Mobility as a Service is a practical tool to help create openness in developing MaaS projects.

Transport Practitioners are encouraged to download the tool and use it to assess programmes and activities in development.

TravelSpirit will collate and benchmark project assessments and refine the tool as Mobility as a Service develops in the UK.

TravelSpirit Index of Openness for Mobility as a Service

TravelSpirit Index of Openness West Midlands Case Study

For further advice and guidance on its use or to submit case studies email: info@travelspirit.io

TravelSpirit publishes first white paper on openness in Mobility as a Service

12 May 2017

The TravelSpirit Foundation published its first white paper today. Titled “Open or Closed? The Case for Openness in Mobility as a Service”, the paper looks at the components of Mobility as a Service and the positive role that the open Internet of Mobility can play. It discusses how open systems and data will improve journeys and ensure new forms of mobility have a positive impact on the public realm.

DOWNLOAD: Whitepaper 1: Open or Closed? The Case for Openness in Mobility as a Service

For further information:

Beate Kubitz, Director of Policy and Communications

beate.kubitz@travelspirit.io  | 07974 369240

Whitepaper 1: Open or Closed? The Case for Openness in Mobility as a Service

There are many elements involved in building the Internet of Mobility. The MaaS ‘ecosystem’ requires contributions from road and rail at the core of public transport to the new disruptors in bike-share and on-demand taxis; to the platform providers which serve up travel options to individual travellers. And in between are various forms of data collection, provision and aggregation, along with the many components of back office payment systems.

In this context what we mean by ‘open’ is many layered. Open can be via the provision and use of open data or open source code. Or, via the growth of local eco-systems of providers who use these open tools to create new businesses and business models. Or through the sharing of data.

‘Closed’, on the other hand, creates proprietary systems which, often as not, will not work with other functionally similar systems within the same sector. Yet convergence is often desirable for efficiency.

This white paper explores the case for openness in Mobility as a Service.

DOWNLOAD TravelSpirit White Paper 1: Open or Closed | May 2017

UCL offers Fully-funded PhD studentship in transport modelling and Mobility as a Service

UCL-Energy invites applicants for a fully-funded four-year PhD studentship in transport modelling

The Urban Transport & Energy Group at UCL Energy Institute invites applications for a fully funded four-year PhD studentship covering UK/EU fees plus stipend to focus on the development of the supply components of an advanced transport and energy activity based model able to simulate the multidimensional impacts of new mobility services on travel behaviour, traffic congestion, and energy consumption.

Application details

How we work

The TravelSpirit Foundation is a hosted by Public Software Community Interest Company (CIC). We function as a trade association to promote TravelSpirit’s core values, and a Research Technology Organisation (RTO) to build the Internet of Mobility.

The strategic direction of TravelSpirit Foundation is steered by a global Executive Board comprised of individuals from the fields of transport, digital and people management.

The current structure of the Executive Board contains the following key roles:

The Chair: Responsible for managing TravelSpirit’s strategic partnerships and wider network, including corporate membership relationships.

The CEO: Responsible for ensuring TravelSpirit is correctly governed; guardian of the TravelSpirit Strategy; lead advocate and adviser.

The COO: Responsible for considering the people management and business operating model implications of a future Mobility as a Service eco-system, and championing change programmes that encourage open collaboration.

The CTO: Responsible for considering the social and technological implications of a future Mobility as a Service eco-system, and championing the Internet of Mobility.

Outside of the Executive Board, TravelSpirit is composed of and supported by the following bodies:

TravelSpirit Foundation CIC: Responsible for supporting TravelSpirit activities and undertaking revenue-generating activities on behalf of the global community.

Regional Market Project (RMP) Boards: Comprised of affiliate and associate members of the trade association. RMP Boards are based on a geographical area and exist to deliver and support projects under the banner of TravelSpirit and in accordance with the 4 core values. At this moment, the strongest RMP resides in the UK. We are currently exploring opportunities to establish RMP in Europe, Asia-Pacific and North America.

Trade Association Members: The basis of TravelSpirit Foundation membership is more than just transactional. To maintain their membership, we expect every member to be taking an active role in the four core values that unite us.

The Executive Board, RMP Boards, and Trade Association Members can commission the CIC to deliver projects, events and other activities on behalf of the wider TravelSpirit community.

Mobility as a Service: Don’t fragment the marketplace

Carplus Bikeplus in Local Transport Today

‘Mobility as a Service’ or MaaS is the most important disruptor of transport today. It’s easy to dismiss this as hype, but, in its recent report for the DfT, the Transport Systems Catapult outlines ‘A future in which people buy bundles of mobility services from Mobility as a Service (MaaS) providers’. MaaS is exciting stuff as it represents a complete change in our personal relationship with transport in which – in its most radical form – we buy mobility in multi-modal bundles accessed via smartphones.

Shared mobility is integral to MaaS, and for this reason Carplus and Bikeplus have a strong interest in shaping the MaaS agenda. MaaS could facilitate travel lifestyles in which people can tailor their transport to the moment, hopping from bus to train, travelling the last mile on a bike share bike, finding a shared car driving the return portion and using car club cars at the weekend. Individuals could set their travel budgets on a month by month basis and no longer sink costs into a privately owned car (or indeed an annual rail ticket).

This vision suddenly creates a viable alternative to car ownership for many more people. The mega-trend shift from owning stuff to buying services means that the next transport revolution is not a mode, but flexible services packaged digitally.

So what?

Research by Carplus, Bikeplus and others over the years has shown consistently that providing attractive alternatives to car ownership in the form of car clubs, ride sharing and bike sharing reduces the number of miles driven per year and the transport carbon footprint of users. These options are increasingly attractive to younger people who aspire less and less to own cars. In larger cities, there are shifts in travel behaviour away from private car ownership as well. With this evidence, we see MaaS as, potentially, the catalyst that kicks the scale of these changes into another league.

It’s for this reason that Carplus and Bikeplus are actively involved in TravelSpirit. As a not-for-profit association guided by a set of public benefit goals and objectives, TravelSpirit provides a progressive forum to pose the important questions that can get lost in the enthusiasm for the technologies of MaaS.

We are particularly interested in the wider considerations of where and how shared transport fits in to MaaS development, what can be learnt from shared transport to accelerate MaaS development, and how to make sure that social and environmental benefits are embedded from the outset.

The vision for TravelSpirit is that all assets are held in the ‘global commons’, curated by TravelSpirit through open governance and open collaboration between parties, enabled by Open Source Initiative and Creative Commons approved licencing. It is supported by a new Community Interest Company, ‘Public Software’ which has been created to provide legal and financial services to TravelSpirit, and other European OpenSource projects. (These are similar in function to the Linux and Mozilla Foundations support for more advanced open source communities.)

TravelSpirit works at all levels: the open source coding, the digital tech sector, data supply chains, transport operators (public transport, leasing, shared mobility) and for local communities, cities and nation states.

Along side the enabling power of new technology, changes in public and private sector involvement in shaping transport unlock the potential of MaaS. MaaS leads to a marketplace of transport providers, and there is uncertainty around how the marketplace will develop. Whilst our research indicates that shared transport benefits environment and society, the likely scale and reach of MaaS means that we need to be vigilant in shaping its outcomes.

We therefore welcome the open ethos of TravelSpirit in helping to contribute to these debates.
Whilst debating how MaaS develops in the UK, and who will shape its outcomes, we can look for international role models and learn from them.

In Finland the Whim app, one of the world’s first fully integrated multimodal transport apps allows users to plan their route and purchase their tickets for bus, train, bike, taxi or car travel.
It operates across all of Finnish cities and public transport networks and the company has signed up all Finland’s rail and city public transport companies and has an agreement with car hire company Sixt. The app offers subscription service or pay-as-you-go options, which gives users access to a hire car.

It is this integration which is the holy grail of open access. Creating a service which allows access to the broadest selection of travel options is surely the best way to ensure an attractive alternative to car ownership.

However, MaaS is growing in dense urban areas, whilst accessibility challenges are often outside these urban cores. We do not want to see a future in which provision is dense and competitive in populous areas and absent outside those. A scenario in which proprietary platforms compete with each other for total domination of the transport sector is likely to lead to the disenfranchisement of local communities and local transport operators – increasing the gulf between the transport rich and the transport poor.

It is therefore essential that the app platforms in development are open source and open to all transport providers.

Sampo Hietanen, founder of MaaS Global and the Whim app, supported the launch of TravelSpirit and called for a healthy competition in the market they are entering:

“Rather than aiming for a ‘winner takes all’ position within the industry, MaaS Global are promoting a ‘roaming ecosystem’ of MaaS operators; who would, together, cover the market for a diverse range of spatial contexts and customer segments.

This approach requires an open approach to the supporting ‘back-office’ infrastructure; hence MaaS Global’s support for TravelSpirit.”

Whilst establishing a broad framework, TravelSpirit is currently concentrating its efforts in Manchester and Birmingham. A range of organisations are involved, including the Department for Transport, Transport for Greater Manchester, Alstom, along with global partners MaaS Global and La Fabrique des Mobilitiés who have already helped ‘crowd-fund’ the launch of TravelSpirit. In addition, at its launch in Manchester, participants at the design workshop ‘crowd-sourced’ their collective expertise to provide the world thought leadership on how best to enable a MaaS revolution.

Although TravelSpirit is a positive step towards open source and open access development, the risks that we could end up with a fragmented offer, are real. In its recent report on MaaS Transport Systems Catapult notes emerging disparate apps:

“There are many existing examples of businesses securing a position across the transport operator, data provider and MaaS provider layers of the ecosystem. For example, Uber’s taxi-based MaaS offering, or alternatively the train operating companies and carshare enterprises that provide apps for their passengers’ use.”

In addition, experimentation by vehicle manufacturers looking for market models that meet people’s emerging preferences for ‘access over ownership’ is adding to the diversity of smartphone based travel booking platforms. And Transport Systems Catapult notes that other players from outside the transport sector may yet enter the field – any number of media, retail or telecom companies (from Google to Amazon) could partner with transport companies to create new structures.

With this in mind, we believe it’s urgent and important that open source frameworks are developed so that travellers do not get locked into fragmented service provision and always have access to the best, most flexible and cost effective means of transport.

Given the success of Whim in Finland, we are encouraged that it is supporting TravelSpirit and we will follow developments in Manchester with interest.