Conference Latest: TravelSpirit 2nd Annual Conference: Date and Venue Announced

TravelSpirit has opened bookings for its next conference:

Practical approaches to embedding Mobility as a Service in the UK

26 September 2017 | The Atrium, London NW1

Interested in Mobility as a Service (MaaS) and want to know more about issues around ‘Open’ and ‘Closed’, that will impact the spread of MaaS?

This conference showcases practical approaches to embedding Mobility as a Service in cities, towns and rural areas.

If you would like to explore issues around Mobility as a Service provision, and understand how to evaluate potential MaaS services, book now!

Speakers include: Jeni Tennison, OBE, Open Data Institute, Maria Kamargianni, UCL Energy Institute, Chris Lane, Transport for West Midlands, Chris Perry, MaaS Global, Gary Stewart, WayraUK and Si Ho, TravelSpirit Foundation.

Find out more

 

Exeter City Futures join us with a radical and ambitious “MOU”

Exeter City Futures and TravelSpirit Foundation have developed a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) as a basis of the city of Exeter’s active involvement with the TravelSpirit Community and strategic collaboration with the TravelSpirit Foundation.

With cities consuming between two-thirds and three-quarters of the world’s energy, their role in driving a clean energy future is inescapable. Around 1.5 million people are added to the global urban population every week, and the proportion of the world’s population living in urban areas is heading for 66 percent by 2050.

The global imperative for change is clear.

Uncontrolled, rapid urbanization presents acute challenges for national and local governments, with constrained capacity and finance for infrastructure delivery. Unplanned and poorly managed urbanization can give rise to inequality, pollution, and costly sprawling development plans.

Too much of city development and planning is based on existing habits and behaviours, which oftentimes neither address the challenges, nor increase happiness.

Around the world new ways of providing mobility are appearing in our towns and cities. At the same time, rapid adoption of mobile internet access is creating new business models and service offerings that change the way we access and utilise transport.
Recently, Mobility as a Service (MaaS) has emerged from within this exciting frontier to offer travellers a powerful new alternative to car ownership. It provides customers and communities a choice of mobility packages, using a range of suitable transport options, all linked through an integrated and seamless user experience.

This is a real step forward. However, we must ensure that the world of new mobility does not take substantial value and profits out of local communities. Instead it must add value and improve citizens’ wellbeing.

For more information on our Memorandum of Understanding, and how you can partner with us on this, and/or develop more city partnerships, please contact our the Chair of TravelSpirit Foundation, Si Ho.

siho@travelspirit.io | +44 (0) 7977 137 824

TravelSpirit launches a new tool to measure the openness of a city’s transport system.

TravelSpirit continues its work on openness in Mobility as a Service by publishing a tool to assess how open new MaaS projects are.

The TravelSpirit Openness Index for Mobility as a Service is a practical tool to help create openness in practice. Created by the TravelSpirit UK Project Board, the tool consists of a methodology for assessing how open a Mobility as a Service offer is. It is an important addition to the growing library of TravelSpirit resources.

TravelSpirit is calling on UK transport practitioners to apply the tool on cities and transport operators. By ‘open-sourcing’ the methodology and working collaboratively the group is working to grow the UK Market for Mobility as a Service.

Chair of the TravelSpirit Foundation, Si Ho said:

“Openness is key to developing scalable, sustainable Mobility as a Service models for the public good. Our new tool enables closed and open elements to be identified – and the steps towards more openness to be quantified for the first time.”

The TravelSpirit Index of Openness for MaaS is a simple and practical tool to help those developing MaaS systems understand their current position and their potential for developing an open MaaS model.

The current version of the tool was peer reviewed and applied to the Transport for West Midlands MaaS project as a demonstrative case-study. The plan is to develop the tool further, with feedback from the UK transport community and support from University College London, who are planning to improve it over the summer, through a Masters dissertation project.

TravelSpirit is calling on the transport community to trial the Index and submit case studies to share understanding of openness in MaaS.  It is inviting contributions to validate and update the initial model and identify gaps, with a view to updating the tool in September 2017 – disseminating the findings at an event planned for the Autumn.

TravelSpirit Index of Openness for Mobility as a Service

TravelSpirit Index of Openness West Midlands Case Study

For further advice and guidance on its use or to submit case studies: info@travelspirit.io

Notes:

For further information please contact Beate Kubitz

Beate.Kubitz@travelspirit.io | +44 (0) 7974 369240

Key resources:

Whitepaper 1: Open or Closed? The Case for openness in Mobility as a Service

The updated TravelSpirit Index of Openness for Mobility as a Service will be published in late 2017.

Travelspirit Foundation appoints new CEO

One year after the launch of the TravelSpirit Community, TravelSpirit Foundation has strengthened its senior leadership team, with two new appointments to its Global Executive. These appointments form part of an important update to the TravelSpirit governance structure.

The changes will enable the organisation to better communicate and accelerate its mission to provide an open framework for integrated mobility and universally accessible services.

TravelSpirit Foundation is now governed by a Global Executive team of four Execs and two non-execs. This team are charged with delivering the Foundation’s Strategic Plan. They are supported by autonomous Regional Market Development Boards, who define and deliver mobility programmes through local partnerships.

The UK Market Development Board has been in place for the last 6 months and has already delivered a series of key outcomes, including thought leadership position papers and an Index of Openness for cities and transport operators, to be released next week. Other Regional Boards, in Europe and Asia, are in the progress of being set up.

Giles Bailey is the newly appointed Chief Executive Officer and Beate Kubitz the new Chief Operating Officer. They join Chairman Si Ho and Chief Technology Officer Jeremy Dalton. Existing team members, Alex Burrows from Alstom Transport UK and Lucy Yu from the Department for Transport will remain on the Board as non-exec directors, to advise on strategic and policy matters.

Giles Bailey said: “It is a great honour to take up the role of CEO of TravelSpirit. One of the key roles of the Executive team will be to reach out to innovators and foundations who are in tune with our message and want to work with us. Together we can change the otherwise default view of new mobility with a more sustainable and effective view of the open Internet of Mobility”.

Giles was previously the TravelSpirit UK Regional Board Chair and has over 25 years of experience in managing transport and innovation within Transport for London, with his own consultancy, Stratageeb, and as a Warwick University lecturer and writer.

Beate Kubitz moves from Director of Communications and Policy, TravelSpirit UK Regional Board, to the role of Chief Operating Officer. Beate’s background is in communications and campaigning in the third sector, including for Carplus Bikeplus. She is currently authoring the first Annual Survey of Mobility as a Service, which will be published this summer by Landor. 

Beate said: “The scope and breadth of this role is both exciting and daunting at the same time. In my first 100 days I want to building on our “open or closed?” whitepaper, by shortly releasing the TravelSpirit Openness Index and following up in July with a thought provoking whitepaper on Autonomy – the implications of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence for Urban Mobility. I’ll also be developing our conference and events programme – crucial, in my view, to bringing everyone together on this globally relevant agenda”. 

Chairman Si Ho added: “The organisation is also looking to grow our UK Project Board with new members. This is the team that delivers TravelSpirit’s programme of activity within the UK market and already consists of an exciting and dynamic mix of local authorities, academia, SME’s and representatives of larger commercial and non-commercial organisations. Please do get in touch with us to explore how you could be part of this team.” 

The TravelSpirit Foundation was established in Manchester in 2016 to provide an open framework for the provision of new mobility services. To successfully achieve our ambitious aims for the emerging mobility sphere – within the UK and across the globe – we set out to build a global network of transport operators, software developers, businesses, policy.

CTO, Jeremy Dalton said: “I am delighted to see how far we’ve come, already, since I flew in to join the team last September. With the four of us in place we can begin to make further in roads. My focus is on our Open Innovation Programme. It is designed to generate resilient solutions to known mobility challenges. We shepherd innovative ideas through a project pipeline that leverages experience, skills exchange, open source tools and assets from the TravelSpirit community. We want to build on what we achieved at Hackout Manchester (see video here) and want to hear from other cities around the globe who want to join the programme.”

Naturally, this global network is diverse, featuring a range of entities with different aims and objectives, so we are united by our four core values:

· Universal Mobility as a Service: We believe that an integrated, connected, multi-modal MaaS system provides the needed path to sustainable and equitable transportation for all people and communities.

· Open Innovation: We believe in an open innovation model, that rewards sharing of information that serves others, even our competitors, and brings benefits to all.

· Global Community: We believe that by connecting coders, planners, activists, and policymakers through a global network, we are better equipped to tackle the toughest mobility and transport challenges.

· Local Benefit: We believe that our work must be grounded in its ability to demonstrate positive change by and for local communities and regions.

For further information please contact info@travelspirit.io or message one of the global team (Si Ho, Giles Bailey, Beate Kubitz, Jeremy Dalton) on social media.

TravelSpirit publishes first white paper on openness in Mobility as a Service

12 May 2017

The TravelSpirit Foundation published its first white paper today. Titled “Open or Closed? The Case for Openness in Mobility as a Service”, the paper looks at the components of Mobility as a Service and the positive role that the open Internet of Mobility can play. It discusses how open systems and data will improve journeys and ensure new forms of mobility have a positive impact on the public realm.

DOWNLOAD: Whitepaper 1: Open or Closed? The Case for Openness in Mobility as a Service

For further information:

Beate Kubitz, Director of Policy and Communications

beate.kubitz@travelspirit.io  | 07974 369240

UCL offers Fully-funded PhD studentship in transport modelling and Mobility as a Service

UCL-Energy invites applicants for a fully-funded four-year PhD studentship in transport modelling

The Urban Transport & Energy Group at UCL Energy Institute invites applications for a fully funded four-year PhD studentship covering UK/EU fees plus stipend to focus on the development of the supply components of an advanced transport and energy activity based model able to simulate the multidimensional impacts of new mobility services on travel behaviour, traffic congestion, and energy consumption.

Application details

Imperial College to Re-Calibrate Travel Time

As mobility experience is increasingly determined not only by duration or monetary cost of travel, new cultures of work have emerged, especially strong among knowledge workers, that exploit non-traditional settings, including public spaces and transport modes, with the aim of improving productivity and well-being by the better alignment of tasks to productive times and spaces.

USL in partnership with Cisco CREATE and Transport for Greater Manchester will soon be announcing an interdisciplinary 3.5-year ICASE PhD studentship to explore productivity and well-being impacts of digital technologies on workers in mobile settings.

Urban Systems Lab (USL) at Imperial College is the latest partner to join the TravelSpirit movement.

USL is a multi-disciplinary research cluster, covering a wide range of techniques and approaches; aimed at re-aligning and re-focusing world-leading academic creativity to address the urgent problems of cities.

Led by the USL Director, Professor John Polak, researchers from the USL have been involved in a number of pioneering research activities, including those surrounding the concept of Mobility as a Service (MaaS).

Some specific examples of USL’s work include development of new analysis techniques for understanding:

By joining the TravelSpirit movement, researchers from USL expect to contribute with new and critical insights into development of MaaS while also interacting with stakeholders to form new partnerships for exploring new avenues for the future of urban mobility.

As mobility experience is increasingly determined not only by duration or monetary cost of travel, USL in partnership with Cisco CREATE and Transport for Greater Manchester will soon be announcing an interdisciplinary 3.5-year ICASE PhD studentship to explore productivity and well-being impacts of digital technologies on workers in mobile settings.

The joint effort is motivated by the trend in which rapid development of new mobile devices and omnipresent connectivity has led to the increasing decoupling of work (and other activities) from specific locations. New cultures of work have emerged, especially strong among knowledge workers, that exploit non-traditional settings, including public spaces and transport modes, with the aim of improving productivity and well-being by the better alignment of tasks to productive times and spaces.

While social science has amassed a significant body of descriptive evidence relating to these practices and their productivity and well-being implications, this knowledge remains largely detached from the quantitative and predictive approaches used in the appraisal and evaluation of digital and physical infrastructure investments.

The aim of the studentship, forming part of the the ESRC-funded London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership, will be to develop new ways of embedding qualitative and quantitative understandings of the impacts of digitisation and connectivity on productivity and well-being into the quantitative frameworks used for infrastructure appraisal and evaluation. The research part of will seek to explore a number of different case studies, including the UK’s largest Internet of Things City demonstrator project, Cityverve in Manchester.

The Urban Systems Lab was formed in October 2015 as a cross faculty partnership between all of Imperial College London’s major Departments and Institutes and a number of external partners. Based at Imperial’s South Kensington Campus, the Urban Systems Lab undertakes the highest quality research in the areas of the planning, design, management, operation and control of urban and regional infrastructure and service systems, in order to inform policy and the understanding of key issues affecting society.

Vision for Shared eCAV Opportunity Launched

“We are heading towards a chaotic approach to public transport that will work because MaaS operating through size and cost-appropriate electric vehicles (AKA buses) will deliver high definition mobility” says Steve Reeves, Head of Business Development at Woodall Nicholson, one of the oldest established coachbuilding companies in the UK, based in Bolton, Lancashire. It dates right back to the 1820’s, when its major market was the building of horse-drawn hansom cabs and carriages. Known nowadays, locally for their UK market leading production line of hearses and limousines, the firm has been placing significant investment in its growing accessible mini-bus business, Mellor Coachcraft, which produces the vehicles out of their factory in Rochdale.

Steve’s full article is provided below:

“My work with Mellor Coachcraft, alongside some amazing people working together on the Connected & Autonomous Vehicles (CAV) Grand Challenge, and in particular Ben Davis, founder of robotics systems firm, GOBOTiX, has led me to believe that bus autonomy is not as far away as people think. A recent tour of University of Salford’s Robotics and Artificial Intelligence capabilities has also, simply, ‘blown my mind’.

Within the parameters of a public-transit/private-operation collaborative agreement; autonomous public transport systems are possible soon, through Shared CAV.

The idea behind Shared CAV is not new. In 1852, Elisha Otis invented the modern elevator as a form of autonomous transport.

In some ways, Shared CAV can be compared with the elevator. People will be carried safely without a driver along a fixed route, and the service will be on-demand. When related to the conveyance of passengers we call this idea the Horizontal Elevator and the path along which it runs a Virtual Tramway.

Just as the Otis elevator made skyscrapers possible, elevators being the enabling technology, similarly, Shared CAV will revolutionise public transport by enabling ‘Mobility as a Service’ (MaaS) to scale outside of London, New York and Berlin.

The UK Government recognises the potential contribution CAV can make to economic growth through the enhanced ability to transport goods and people more efficiently and effectively. By deploying emergent technologies and encouraging collaboration across different sectors, the opportunity exists to generate the required improvements in a sustainable manner.

The UK Gov’s Innovate Programme and the official autonomy policy unit (Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles) has actioned considerable support through grants for collaborative agreements between companies that can deliver a combination of 3C capability, security, vehicle platform technology, robotic interfaces and Artificial Intelligence, all leading to vehicle autonomy.

Without the full support of local transit and public authorities, roadways cannot be prepared for near-time vehicle autonomy. Colleagues from Mouchel explained during Shared CAV development workshops that roadways selected to host the virtual tramways will need a degree of light infrastructural support to work safely. In some instances, a council, even a parish council might be able to access this potential though their active involvement.

Who will be Shared CAV’s early adopters?
We expect there to be high demand for a turnkey solution from:
• Urban areas that are in current grid-lock.
• Industrial estates access through parking lots
• Airports optimising passenger flow
• Feeder routes for hospitals and resort complexes

Shared CAV is for people and the places who understand that the only important ‘driver is ‘access’, not ownership! As the UITP report, Autonomous vehicles: a potential game changer? describes, these places will benefit from the creation of a flexible on-demand system will tackle congestion head-on, by reducing the number of single-occupancy vehicles on our roads, by connecting to and strengthening radial mass transit routes and meeting orbital travel needs that are often less well served by public transport.

The time is right for a new approach to mobility. An interconnected world needs a transport network delivering mobility options that offer services far exceeding current driven platforms.

Manchester has a benchmark tram system. It brings many parts of the city together and is generally regarded as a success by those that use it. However, new trams come with a massive cost burden and considerable disruption in their construction. Indeed, this may well be the last metropolitan tram project of its size in the UK again?

The Virtual Tramway, a new concept developed by GOBOTiX, does not have guide rails or tracks, it is created using GIS mapping tools and relies on predictive analysis data embedded within the maps supported by on-board analytical capability delivered through industrial computers sensors, cameras and CCTV. Integration with the urban traffic systems is achieved using wideband width communications platforms connected to a resilient command centre.

The development teams at Woodall Nicholson engaged with key industry partners and specialists believe that early Shared CAV vehicles will consist of appropriate-sized buses (between 8 and 16 seats) that can work alone, or, as part of a platoon. These buses may be traditionally driven too! A truly three-for-one proposition.

We already have a ground transport mix of rail, trams, buses, taxi, private hire, cycling, walking, etc. Introducing to the ground network autonomous capability and MaaS technology will create widely diverging outcomes, rendering long-term prediction of the behaviour of the system challenging, to say the least. This becomes even more evident when you consider the direction Airbus is taking the single-occupancy travel market, with its intention to test a self-flying taxi by the end of the year.

We are heading towards a chaotic approach to public transport that will work because MaaS operating through size and cost-appropriate electric vehicles (AKA buses) will deliver high definition mobility. Therefore, I have decided to join the TravelSpirit Foundation, which has been established to accelerate the adoption of Mobility as a Service (MaaS) systems that integrate discovery, booking, and payment of multi-modal transport service offerings under an open marketplace, which will give my clients, like Woodall Nicholson, a far greater access to this evolving new market opportunity.

The time may come where costly mass transit delivery platforms such as the 110 passengers ‘bendy buses’ or even the iconic London Double Decker will be on our roads simply to manage peak ‘rush’ hour transportation, particularly when platooning smaller buses cannot cope. Size appropriate Big-Taxi and LiteBus will carry the load during normalised traffic periods.

We should dispel one myth; the proponents of Shared CAV are concerned about enabling new on-demand services, not removing drivers from existing scheduled service routes.

Ben Davis tells me that the Virtual Tramway system will operate without stations and without a timetable, be on demand. He explains that its frequency will be managed by need.

The main advantages of this first-step, flexible platform are low implementation costs and high replicability. To guarantee the safety of such a new system, similar signage and painted “rails” as would be deployed for Trams will be used to alert people and road users to the fact that an autonomous bus runs on the route.

The system will be safer as people will treat it as a tram and not take the kind of risks they might with a small pod. Think along the lines: how do you drive when next to a bus vs. a car? You exercise more control and provide it with more room.

Crossing a multi-lane junction is challenging even for drivers. CCTV will be installed to stream data in real time to the vehicles navigation system, this will give the vehicle the advantage of seeing around corners. A Virtual Tramway track does not need stations, overhead power or rails but it does need some on-the-ground support, all of which can be managed by councils as small integrated projects. The more Virtual Tramways we create, the lower the costs and better return on investment.

The solution is flexible enough to incorporate future changes and advancements in technology, unlike a real tramway. The vehicles will be able to deviate from their “Virtual Tramway” under certain circumstances only, when safe to do so. In the event of there being a problem the vehicle would stop, and a tele-operator will slowly move the vehicle out of the way of others to allow for transition from manned to unmanned once the system is proven.

All this means that as the system matures beyond the end of the project, it will increase its capability to deal with changing situations and run in a less constrained way as safety permits.
In Summary:

DFT compliant business cases, developed by Transport for Greater Manchester and Steer Davies Gleave and Alliance Manchester Business School have focused on the Virtual Tramway solution operating a 16 Seat Electric LiteBus with the necessary infrastructural support demonstrates a healthy return on investment of 2.6. This number does not include out of hours running and is solely based on new services. The actual number could be as high as 4.0

The key enabler and first step towards the outcomes predicted in the UITP report could be Virtual Tramways. They are low in cost and disruption, predicted to be inexpensive to operate and will be safe. Virtual Tramways is an idea that could open the Shared CAV potential to an infinite number of other vehicles delivering a myriad of functions. This solution brings CAV into urban environments and will not be limited only to electric buses.

The cost of laying and maintaining a tramway or guided bus route can be excessive compared to a Shared CAV solution that has much higher speed of deployment and is scalable. In other cases, Shared CAV can strengthen the business case for a hard infrastructure investment, by widening out the benefits.

The Government are right to promote CAV as an idea, and I am glad to see it feature highly in the consultation for a new Industrial Strategy for the UK. In my view, they may have to accept slightly more constrained (but still driverless) public transport solutions in a step-by-step scalable model. Smart transport and communication businesses are currently researching the platforms and technologies needed to deliver this exciting vision for the future, supported by growing clusters, industry-led consortia, such as, here in the North, the Northern Automotive Alliance and the Northern Robotics Network.”

Steve Reeves, Head of Business Development, Woodall Nicholson

Hackout Manchester entered into UITP Global Hackathon Programme

Youth For Public Transport (Y4PT) Foundation, with the support of the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) and its members, and following the long-standing tradition of Y4PT Youth Lab series, is promoting the organization of local transport hackathons around the world, by combining the best of boundless human creativity and the benefits of current information and communications technologies (ICTs) in collaborative environments, with the aim of advancing transport sector towards sustainability.

Different local stakeholders such as universities, youth groups, ICT companies, transport operators, authorities, start-up mentors and hackers are called to collaborate with Y4PT and to be part of the world’s first ever global transport hackathon.

Everyone is invited to get on board. This is an one-off opportunity to show to your audience and users how important is for you to support this kind of events where innovation and creativity is putting forward new ICT-related solutions to boost both the private sector business performance and the public sector policy efficacy, and thus to unlock new opportunities to expand, diversify and renew your organization’s portfolio of products and services.

Winners from each local transport hackathon will join other Canada-based hackers at the 1st Y4PT Global Transport Hackathon Montreal 2017 (http://www.y4pt.org/projects/hackathon) in the framework of the 62th UITP Global Public Transport Summit Montreal 2017the world’s oldest and leading sustainable transport event – to contest in a final round for unveiling the world’s best ground-breaking transport solutions.

Hackout Manchester is one of twenty cities selected by UITP as ‘international prize locations’; funding for the winners of Hackout Manchester to fly out to Montreal to participate in the Global Transport Hackathon in May 2017. Other ‘prize cities’ are Almaty, Bangalore, Brescia, Brussels, Bogotá, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Ghent, Hyderabad, Kampala, Lisbon, London, Madrid, Medellín, Santiago de Chile, São Paulo, Skopje, Cape Town and Stockholm.

 

 

International Association of Public Transport promote AVs as key enabler for MaaS

According to a new position paper from UITP, there is an opportunity to enable cities to function with 80% fewer cars, but this will only happen if AVs are introduced in fleets of driverless shared autonomous vehicles of different sizes that reinforce an efficient high capacity public transport network.

Shared fleets, integrated with traditional public transport offer the possibility of a better urban future, cutting noise and environmental pollution, improving traffic efficiency and parking and in the process liberating vast amounts of urban space for other purposes. “When 1.2m people around the world die each year in car-related deaths, 90% of which are due to human error, the road safety benefits are also significant,” said UITP Secretary General, Alain Flausch.

Public authorities must take an active role in the roll-out of AVs to ensure their shared use with measures to encourage shared mobility and limit single car occupancy (eg. road pricing or taxation) and provide ‘Mobility as a Service’ platforms (as whoever controls the platform controls travel behaviour). Trials should also begin on public roads to see how best to integrate AVs into the mobility eco-system and preparations made for the impact on employment as some driving jobs could disappear and others needing specific skills could arise.

For more information: http://www.uitp.org/autonomous-vehicles